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06-28-2011 | www.itemlive.com

By Chris Stevens / The Daily Item | Posted: Tuesday, June 28, 2011 12:00 am

LYNN - A group of roughly 30 youths from across the city are forming a youth council with the goal of having their voices heard by the city at large.

Diana Kerry, director of North Shore Community College’s Public Policy Institute, said the idea for a youth council grew from a city-wide youth initiative. Kerry said students came together from Marshall Middle School, the high schools, Girls Inc., KAYA (a Khmer youth group) and the Y with an aim to focus on at least one issue facing young people in the city. The challenge, Kerry said, was to research and try their best to resolve the issue.

03-21-2011 | www.itemlive.com

LYNN - A pilot after-school program has high school kids giving up one night a week to talk politics, community action, current events and a even a little pop culture at North Shore Community College.

The program, tentatively titled the Youth Civics and Politics Initiative, is the brainchild of City Councilor Brendan Crighton.

He said when he ran for his seat on the council he received a lot of support from high school kids, predominantly from Lynn Classical High School. He said he got to know a number of the students, who often volunteered daily. Crighton acknowledged that the kids got class credit for volunteering but he said the students’ dedication and their interest still blew him away.

05-15-2010 | www.itemlive.com

LYNN - Thousands of Cambodians live in Lynn, but many have never set foot in City Hall out of fear or simply because they are unaware of available municipal services.

Ward 5 Councilor Brendan Crighton wants to change their way of thinking, which is why he has partnered with the local Khmer Cultural Planning Committee to host Cambodian Community Day today at City Hall.

According to Crighton, the Cambodian communities in Lynn and Lowell combined make up the third largest concentration of Khmer-speaking people in the world, yet many of these immigrants do not take advantage of local clinics, translators or direct services.